Are You Playing Games with Your Candidates?

Kristina Finseth

 

Many organizations play games with their candidates, and not in a good way. They have a horrible application process that takes forever, and their candidate experience just plain sucks.

However, those aren’t the kinds of games I’m talking about here. In fact, I’m talking about why you should play more games with your candidates, making the recruiting process more fun for everyone involved, and taking the boring out of those assessments.

Here are some companies successfully incorporating gamification in their recruiting and selection process, enhancing the candidate experience in the process.

Unilever As a global organization receiving thousands upon thousands of new graduate applications each and every year, Unilever decided to turn to gamification as part of its application and selection process. Once a candidate submits their application, they get to play interactive games, providing valuable insight to Unilever on potential fit with desired skills, traits, and their mission, values and purpose as an organization.



 

Marriott International A few years back, Marriott International decided to launch a virtual Facebook game called “My Marriott Hotel” where players could create a virtual workplace, managing the hotel themselves. After playing the game, potential candidates were redirected to the Marriott career site to browse available opportunities, and submit their resumes.



 

Google Google launched Code Jam, requesting developers from around the world to put their skills to the test by solving complex algorithmic puzzles. Conducted online only and equipped with a World Finals, this initiative not only helps people challenge and develop their skills as developers, it’s also an excellent way to tap into talent in a nonconventional way.



 

PwC As an accounting and consulting firm, PwC isn’t necessarily known for its fun and creative recruiting process. That is until they added a game called Multipoly, where candidates are placed on teams, presented business problems, and use their background and skills to solve those very problems. This game enabled candidates to better understand what PwC was looking for in a live interview, and in turn, the organization could make better decisions on who to bring in for that face-to-face next step.



These are just some of the companies who have implemented gamification into their recruiting and selection process. I only foresee the number of companies joining in on the game increasing in the next few years.

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What do you think of gamification in the recruiting process?